How To Hook Up Red Green Blue Cables To Red Yellow White

Norvan Martin
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If you need to connect old AV equipment to newer equipment, you may find that you need to convert red, blue, green cables to red, yellow, white cables (component to composite conversion).

Alright, let’s simplify this!

So, you have:

  1. Red-Green-Blue Cable (Component Video) – Only for showing HD video.
  2. Red-Yellow-White Socket (Composite Video) – Yellow is for basic video, and the white and red are for left and right audio (sound).

The main points:

  • You can’t mix and match the Red-Green-Blue Cable and plug it into the Red-Yellow-White Socket because they do different things. If you try, the video will look strange and the sound will be off.
  • The Red-Green-Blue cables only carry video; they don’t handle sound.
  • If your TV only has the Yellow-White-Red ports, and your device has the Red-Green-Blue outputs, they won’t connect directly. However, you can buy a converter to make them compatible.

The Solution:

In order to hook up Red-Green-Blue cables to a Red-Yellow-White socket, you need to purchase a Component-to-Composite converter available in the market. Think of it like trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. You’ll need an adapter to make it work. You can find the best converters listed below.

Top 2 Composite To Component Converters

Our experts have researched the best composite to component converters on Amazon, and we will discuss the top two in this review. You may want to take note of the features, pros, and cons so that you can make an informed buying decision.

1. Composite S-Video To Component Video RGB Sync On Green Converter

This composite to component converter is arguably the best in the market today. It is a dual-purpose converter, which you can use to convert either a standard composite video or S-Video signal to an interlaced component video or RGB.

What that means is that the converter can accept inputs in two formats – the standard composite and S-Video signals, and produce outputs in two formats – the component YUV video or RGB.

To enable the converter to function well for different inputs and outputs, it comes with a selector switch, which you can use to select your preferred input and output.

For the component video output, you will get 480i/576i for TV or projector displays. In the case of the RGB output, you will either get 15.625 KHz/50Hz or 15.734 KHz/60Hz on a monitor display.

The output of the converter is clean and rich in color. You can use it with CCTV cameras for video surveillance. Also, you can use it with a video multiplexer or quad processor to component video.

The detection of the NTSC/PAL/SECAM devices is automatic, and it supports a wide range of video systems. Some notable video systems supported include PAL, PAL-M, PAL-N, NTSC3.58, SECAM, and NTSC4.43.

Powering the converter is done with the switching power adapter that comes with it. Another thing you should know about the converter is that it has an auto power-saving mode.

Pros

  • It supports dual inputs and outputs, with the aid of a push button.
  • The output quality is outstanding.
  • There is no distortion in the original quality.
  • It supports major standard video formats.
  • It is easy to use.
  • It has auto-detection of video devices.
  • The conversion is seamless.
  • It has a power-saving mode.

Cons

  • It needs power to operate.
  • The power cable is short.
  • It is a bit pricey, though it delivers value.

2. Composite S-Video To HD Component Video VGA Converter Scaler

The composite S-video to HD component video VGA converter scaler is second on our list of top two composite to component converters.

This converter is cost-effective and can be used to convert both composite video and S-video signals to component video or VGA.

When you use the converter, you are guaranteed a high-resolution output that is sharp and detailed.

With the converter, you can achieve up to 1080p HD output or even 1600 by 1200 when you select VGA output.

Though you shouldn’t expect a significant transformation in quality, the converter enhances the quality of the input for better viewing. A great feature is that the converter automatically reduces noise, which is something you might not find in many similar converters.

There is no room for out-of-sync output because of real-time video processing, allowing the audio and video signals to sync.
Although you can use this converter with S-Video input, you will need to focus on selecting the composite input with the push button so that you can feed in signals using the red, yellow, and white cable.

To get the output using a red, green, blue cable, you will select the component video output on the converter.

All the major standard video formats – both PAL and NTSC formats – are supported, and their detection is automatic. The converter uses a frame rate of 50/60Hz for converting signals to ensure a glitch-free display. The converter comes with a power adapter of 100-240VAC that you can use to power it.

Pros
The converter serves a dual-conversion purpose.
It supports auto noise reduction.
There is no distortion or loss of input signal.
Excellent image quality.
You will get a high-resolution output.

Cons
You may achieve better quality with the 480p resolution.
The power cable is not very long.

How To Use And Connect A Composite To Component Converter

Using a composite to component converter is easy. It is ideal in scenarios where you intend to connect a device like a game box with a composite port to a TV or monitor with a component port. So, how exactly can you connect a composite to a component converter? Composite to Component Video Input Connections

Here is how to go about it. Take one end of the composite (red, yellow, white) cable and connect it to the side of the converter that is compatible with the 3-in-1 cable.

Then, connect the other end of the composite cable to your equipment, like a gaming console. While you do so, make sure you follow the conventional color code for such connections.

That is, use the yellow connector to transmit the video signal and the red and white connectors for the right and left components of the audio signal.

How To Use And Connect A Composite To Component Converter

For connecting the component cable, connect one end of each of the five connectors to your output devices, such as your TV or PC monitor.

Connect the other end to the free end of the composite to component converter. You must follow the color code convention while you do so.

For the best audio quality, make sure you connect the red and white audio connectors similarly to the composite audio connectors.

However, it is a different scenario for the video connectors, which, in this case, are three in number.

Ensure you connect the green connector, which is for transmitting brightness, and the red and blue connectors, which are for transmitting color.

Finally, to power the red, yellow, white to red, green, blue converter, you must connect one end of a USB cable to your TV or monitor and the other end to the USB (input power) port on the converter.

Using a Multi-purpose Composite to Component Converter

Unlike a sole-purpose converter used for converting composite to component cables, multi-purpose converters are a bit different.

You can use them to perform one or more other signal conversion jobs. Typically, a multi-purpose converter comes with a switch that you can use to select the type of conversion you wish to accomplish.

Using a Multi-purpose Composite to Component Converter

For instance, if you have a converter that can convert both composite video and S-Video signals to component or HDMI signals, it will come with a push-button.

You will be able to use the push button to select your preferred input and output. For this converter under consideration, you can perform four different conversions.

That’s because it accepts two different types of inputs – composite video and S-Video signals, and two types of outputs – component and HDMI signals.

To use such a converter to convert composite to component cables, you must ensure you use the correct cables – composite and component cables.

Aside from that, make sure you select the correct conversion with the push button. It is worth mentioning that multi-purpose converters are somewhat pricey due to their versatility in handling multiple conversions.

Example Uses Of A Composite To Component Converter

There are several example use cases where you can use a composite to component converter. But, we’ll look at only three (3) scenarios.

  1. Connecting an old VCR to a TV with red, green, blue ports: Usually, new VCR players may have red, green, blue ports, but the old ones may not have support for these ports. To connect such an old VCR to a TV with support for a component cable, you can use a composite to component converter. The converter splits the video signal transmitted by the yellow connector of the composite cable into three components transmitted by the red, green, and blue connectors of the component cable.
  2. Connecting your Nintendo gaming console to a TV with component cable support: Ideally, the Nintendo gaming console comes with support for the composite – red, yellow, white AV cable. To connect it to a TV with only support for the component cable, you will need to use the composite to component converter. The use case is similar to that explained above in scenario 1.
  3. Connecting a Camcorder to a new TV: Most new televisions do not support the red, yellow, white (composite) cable, but do support the red, green, blue (component) cable. Connecting a camcorder to a new TV set may be difficult unless you use a red, yellow, white to red, green, blue converter. Connecting the cables to the devices and the converter is the same as the explanation in scenario 1 above.
  4. Connecting a CCTV Camera to Monitors: Given the high rate of security threats in the world today, businesses and individuals may install CCTV cameras to observe footage on a single or multiple monitors. To connect these cameras to the monitors, you will need a composite to component converter. That’s because most CCTV cameras support composite cables while the monitors don’t. So, a converter will help connect the composite cable to a component cable, which is compatible with the monitor.
  5. Connecting DVD Players to new TV sets: While connecting a DVD to a TV set was seamless in the past using a composite cable, it is no longer so today. Newer TVs do not have RCA or composite cable jacks, making a direct connection impossible now. This is where a composite to component converter plays an important role. With the converter, you can still connect your DVD to your new TV set, provided you have both composite and component cables. The connection method is as described earlier in this article.

Can You Plug Composite Cables Into Component Slots?

Composite cables are not designed to be compatible with component ports unless the device has been specifically custom-designed for that purpose (accepting composite signals). You will not be able to plug the yellow plug into any one of the green, blue, or red ports and get the correct video.

Are Component Cables As Good As HDMI?

HDMI and component cables are two of the most preferred connectors to provide HD video output. They are both high quality and work well, but most audio-visual enthusiasts would choose HDMI for several reasons.

  • The HDMI cable is a single cable that supports both audio and video inputs.
  • It provides higher-resolution picture quality with surround sound audio.
  • It’s a single cable for both audio and video hook-up that delivers superior picture quality and surround-sound audio.

How to connect component cables to a TV

To do this, 

  • Connect the component cable to the video and audio outputs on your video source, which you want to connect to your TV.
  • Connect the other end of the cable to the component audio and video ports on your TV.

NOTE: Pay attention to the color coding of the ports while connecting.

Composite To Component Conversion

Before delving into composite to component conversion, we’d like to explain some important terms. Let’s begin with an explanation of a composite cable.

What Is A Composite Cable: A composite cable is the same as a red, yellow, white cable, which you can use to transmit analog video and audio signals.what is a Composite Cable

The yellow connector of the composite (3-in-1) cable is for transmitting the video signal, while the red and white connectors transmit the audio signal.
What Is A Component Cable: The component cable, on the other hand, is the same as the red, green, blue cable. You can use the component cable to transmit digital video signals, and unlike the composite cable, it is a 5-in-1 cable.
While the red and white audio connectors transmit the audio signal, the green, blue, and red connectors transmit the video signal. The video signal splits into three – the Y, U, and V signals.
What Is Composite To Component Conversion: Composite to component conversion is a simple technique for splitting the video signal of a composite video into three different components – the Y component for transmitting the brightness, and the Yb and Yr components for transmitting the color difference.Composite to Component
The conversion helps improve video quality because the component video resolution (1080px) is higher than that of the composite (480px).
A composite to component converter uses a frame rate of 50/60Hz to convert signals, ensuring a glitch-free display.
You must power on the converter before use, which you can do with its switching power adapter of 100-240VAC. Note that the converter may come with an auto power-saving mode.

Input and Output Video Formats of the Conversion

Composite to component cable converters accept a wide range of input formats. They support most standard video systems. Notable supported video systems include PAL, PAL-M, PAL-N, NTSC3.58, SECAM, and NTSC4.43. Often, the converter automatically detects the NTSC/PAL/SECAM devices.

For component video output, you will get 480i/576i for TV or projector displays. The converter’s output is clean and rich in color. You can use it with CCTV cameras for video surveillance. Additionally, you can use it with a video multiplexer or quad processor for component video.

What Does A Composite To Component Converter Do?

The main difference between composite and component cables lies in the video transmission aspect.

Audio transmission uses two connectors – the red and white connectors. However, for video transmission, the composite cable uses only the yellow connector, while the component cable uses three connectors – the red, green, and blue connectors.What Does A Composite To Component Converter Do
Thus, the composite to component converter helps split the video signal from the yellow connector of the composite cable into two components.
The first and second components represent the brightness and color of the video signal, respectively.

The brightness (Y) and color difference (Yb and Yr) components are transmitted via the green, and the red and blue connectors of the component cable, respectively. If you wonder why you might need to convert a composite cable to a component cable, the reason is incompatibility.

In a scenario where a TV or PC monitor lacks support or a jack for composite cables, and you want to use an old VCR device with only composite cable support, a conversion might be your only option. This allows you to connect the devices without compromising video quality. While discussing what a composite to component cable converter can do, it’s essential to mention what it cannot do.

Do not expect the converter to produce a quality significantly better than the original.
For instance, if the input video is black and white, expecting a colored output is misguided. It’s often a case of “garbage in, garbage out.”

Conclusion

As you’ve read above, the composite to component converter allows you to connect your old RCA-supported devices to newer models of TVs and monitors.

You might find alternative methods, but using this converter is arguably the cheapest, with the best quality and ease of use.

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Norvan Martin is the founder of BoomSpeaker.com. He is a professional Electronics Engineer and is passionate about home theater systems and AV electronics. BoomSpeaker was created as an online hub to share his knowledge and experiences as it relates to home theaters and home audio electronics. My email: [email protected]  Connect on Pinterest and Linkedin